Classification and the History of Greek Art: The Unclassified Past

Louise Smith Bross Lectures: Milette Gaifman

Classification and the History of Greek Art: The Unclassified Past

Lecture
15 May 2018 5.00pmAdd to Calendar 2018-05-15 22:00:00 2018-05-15 22:00:00 Classification and the History of Greek Art: The Unclassified Past Milette Gaifman, Associate Professor of Classics and History of Art, Yale University Lecture 3: "The Unclassified Past" Series Description: How do classifications inform our understanding of artworks from Classical antiquity? How did labels shape the formation of the history of Greek art? In these lectures Milette Gaifman explores the fundamental role of the classificatory act in our viewing of Greek art and architecture in the modern era. Taking a Classical Athenian monument as its point of departure, the series examines how ancient finds, such as bronze figurines, marble temples or painted vases relate to art historical categories such as sculpture, painting, or decorative arts. It considers the consequences of the gaps between historical artifacts and existing taxonomies, as well as the ways of expanding our conceptual frameworks when looking at the visual arts of the past. CWAC 157 Louise Smith Bross Lectures: Milette Gaifman arthistory@uchicago.edu America/Chicago public
CWAC 157
gaifman

Milette Gaifman, Associate Professor of Classics and History of Art, Yale University

Lecture 3: "The Unclassified Past"

Series Description: How do classifications inform our understanding of artworks from Classical antiquity? How did labels shape the formation of the history of Greek art? In these lectures Milette Gaifman explores the fundamental role of the classificatory act in our viewing of Greek art and architecture in the modern era. Taking a Classical Athenian monument as its point of departure, the series examines how ancient finds, such as bronze figurines, marble temples or painted vases relate to art historical categories such as sculpture, painting, or decorative arts. It considers the consequences of the gaps between historical artifacts and existing taxonomies, as well as the ways of expanding our conceptual frameworks when looking at the visual arts of the past.