Intercollegiate Undergraduate Art History Symposium

2019 Intercollegiate Undergraduate Art History Symposium

Sunday, April 28th from 10am - 3pm

Maya Hieroglyph Workshop (Part 2 of 2)

Introduction to Maya Hieroglyphics Workshop

Led by Franco Rossi, Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Illinois, Chicago

Session 1: Friday April 26, 10:00 am to 4:30 pm

Session 2: Friday May 3, 10:00 am to 4:30 pm

Please email brittenham@uchicago.edu to preregister. Lunch will be provided for those who preregister.

No experience is required to participate in this workshop. The second session will build off of material covered in the first workshop. 

Maya Hieroglyph Workshop (Part 1 of 2)

Introduction to Maya Hieroglyphics Workshop

Led by Franco Rossi, Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Illinois, Chicago

Exhibition Preview, Gregg Bordowitz: I Wanna Be Well

Exhibition Preview, Gregg Bordowitz: I Wanna Be Well

Abbott Galleries 182–184 and the Donna and Howard Stone Gallery 186, Modern Wing

Art Institute of Chicago

Co-curated by Solveig Nelson (PhD '18)

This exhibition is the first monographic survey of the videos, drawings, sculpture, performance, and poetry that comprise Gregg Bordowitz’s decades-long interdisciplinary practice.

VMPEA: Stanley Abe

Guest: Stanley Abe, Associate Professor of Art and Art History

Department of Art, Art History, & Visual Studies, Duke University

"Imagining Sculpture" 

VMPEA: Pan Li

Guest: Pan Li, Professor

Visiting Scholar, Department of Art History, University of Chicago

"Tsuguharu Fujita's 'Marvelous creamy white'" 

VMPEA: Zhiyan Yang

Guest: Zhiyan Yang, PhD candidate

Department of Art History, University of Chicago

"'The Work Didn't Exist Before Its Publication' - Architectural Journals During the Transitional Period (1979-200x)"

VMPEA: Yan Jin

Guest: Yan Jin, MAPH Student

Humanities Division, University of Chicago. 

Looking East: Early Christian Art Beyond Christian Hegemony

Jas’ Elsner, “Looking East: Early Christian Art Beyond Christian Hegemony”

Hutopia Opening Reception and Discussion

Dedicated to the curious phenomenon of the philosopher’s retreat, HUTOPIA takes as its point of departure two famous philosopher’s huts: Martin Heidegger’s Black Forest cabin in the German village of Todtnauberg and the lesser-known mountain refuge built by Ludwig Wittgenstein in the remote Norwegian village of Skjolden. Both huts were constructed around the same time to serve the same purpose: offering their occupants the kind of isolation conducive to thinking the kind of thoughts that would go on to revolutionize twentieth-century philosophy.